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Looking for girlfriend > 40 years > Can you look at a solar eclipse through your phone

Can you look at a solar eclipse through your phone

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By Jeff Herman , chief editor. Whether you choose to view a solar eclipse from your home, a hotel or an open field along roadway, you need to know how to watch a solar eclipse without damaging your eyes. By definition, a solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly or nearly directly between the sun and earth, causing the moon to block most of the sun partial eclipse or fully block it total eclipse for a brief period. Solar eclipse glasses are inexpensive, very dark filters with cardboard or paper frames that are designed to protect your eyes from retina damage when viewing an eclipse. Staring at a solar eclipse or staring at the sun at any time can cause a burned retina — called solar retinopathy or solar maculopathy — that can cause permanent vision loss.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How to take a picture of the solar eclipse with your smartphone

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: What Happened If You Used an iPhone to Record Solar Eclipse

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As you may have heard, a total solar eclipse is making its way across the continental US on Monday. You need to wear protective solar-eclipse glasses to safely watch the moon cross in front of the sun, as the sun's powerful rays can cause serious eye damage if viewed directly. There are several good ways to watch the event without staring at the sun if you haven't been able to find glasses.

But one method of trying to watch without directly looking should be avoided, according to Dr. Don't try to watch the eclipse through the front-facing selfie camera on your phone, Tezel said in a news release.

You can take photos of the eclipse with your phone camera without damaging the sensor, as long as you don't have a zoom lens attached — there's no danger to the camera itself. But your phone screen can reflect ultraviolet light back into your eye, according to Tezel, potentially causing the same damage — solar retinopathy — as looking at the sun itself. Even taking a selfie without wearing eclipse glasses could reflect the sun's light back into your eyes. According to NASA , symptoms of sun damage usually include blurred vision, seeing dark or yellow spots, pain, or losing vision in the center of the eye.

That can make it hard or impossible to read or to focus on whatever is in the center of your view. Some people's vision recovers within a day — but there could still be damage to the eye, which could result in later problems. In general, people recover as much vision as they ever will within six months of the event, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

If you are within the mile-wide band of totality, you can safely remove your protective glasses once the sun is covered. You'll know it's time because you won't be able to see anything with those glasses on. But as soon as beads of light start to reappear, it's time to protect your eyes again. If you can't find eclipse glasses, we'd recommend making a simple pinhole camera to watch safely. Account icon An icon in the shape of a person's head and shoulders. It often indicates a user profile.

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Kevin Loria. Vision Space.

Solar eclipse and your eyes: How to view an eclipse safely

There was never any doubt about the necessity of this blog post. And in case you didn't know the solar eclipse is set to premiere on Monday, August, 21, - may be a good idea to set your reminder now. So we turned to our never-fail answer machine, Google, to see if and how we should be using our phone cameras to document this natural wonder.

As you may have heard, a total solar eclipse is making its way across the continental US on Monday. You need to wear protective solar-eclipse glasses to safely watch the moon cross in front of the sun, as the sun's powerful rays can cause serious eye damage if viewed directly. There are several good ways to watch the event without staring at the sun if you haven't been able to find glasses.

Celestial Objects to Observe. You can unsubscribe anytime. Read this advice from expert eclipse-chasers before you use your smartphone to photograph a solar eclipse. The advice many experts offer to first-time eclipse watchers is to experience totality without any lens in the way — even the longest total solar eclipse seems like the briefest moment in time.

Can You Photograph the Solar Eclipse with Your Phone or Tablet?

The total solar eclipse of is upon us, and many people are asking: Can I photograph the phenomenon with my cellphone or tablet? With a few caveats, the answer is "yes. Today Aug. You can watch a livestream of the eclipse on the Space. Here are a few quick tips and suggestions if you plan to photograph the partial or total solar eclipse using your cellphone or tablet. Tip No. It is possible to damage your cellphone or tablet while photographing the sun, according to Angela Speck , co-chair of the American Astronomical Society's Solar Eclipse Task Force and director of astronomy at the University of Missouri. Speck told Space. This could depend on the particular device you have, and how long you focus the camera on the sun.

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W hen the total solar eclipse occurs on Aug. In a shift from 38 years ago, many of the sky watchers this month will want to photograph the solar eclipse on their phone. Still, there are ways to work around those difficulties, says Symes, who has been photographing the sun, moon and planets with his iPhone since Here are three of his suggestions for how to photograph the solar eclipse with your phone:.

According to the Astronomical Society of India, the eclipse will be visible as a 'Ring of Fire' in some parts of Southern India and partial in the rest of the country. Solar Eclipse takes place when the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun.

For those of us who waited too long to snag a pair of safe, legit solar-viewing glasses , using a phone as an intermediary to view the eclipse sounds like a clever, accessible hack. If you point your phone at the full, bright sun, it will immediately respond by darkening the entire view, just as your eyes are averse to staring directly at the sun. But the dimming of the sun during a partial eclipse can confuse your phone, too, and cause your phone screen to burn too brightly where there is a sliver of sun. This can cause damage to your phone, including the burning out of pixels on your screen.

Use Your Smartphone to Shoot a Solar Eclipse

If you don't get a snapshot of the solar eclipse, can you really say you watched it? I think we all know by now that the millennial generation has zero shame in their selfie game, and while I understand that itching desire to do it for the 'gram, cautionary measures should be taken no matter how you view and capture this Kodak moment. Solar eclipse or not, you don't want to risk exposing the naked eye to sun rays. To avoid risk of irreversible damage for the sake of an Instagram photo, here are a few tips on how to use your smartphone to view and document a total or partial eclipse this afternoon and onwards.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Watching the Solar Eclipse with a Cell Phone

You can unsubscribe anytime. Read this advice from expert eclipse-chasers before you use your smartphone to photograph a solar eclipse. The advice many experts offer to first-time eclipse watchers is to experience totality without any lens in the way — even the longest total solar eclipse seems like the briefest moment in time. Before we begin, safety first : never look directly at the Sun without proper eye protection, using either solar viewing glasses or a No. Find a list of reputable vendors of solar glasses and filters here. Do not use ordinary sunglasses, polarizing filters, or neutral-density filters — they are not safe.

How to Photograph the Solar Eclipse With Your Phone

A solar eclipse will occur across most of the United States on April 8, , including a small band of total solar eclipse stretching from east to west across much of the continent. Before you do, please take the time to learn about the dangers to your vision and how to protect your eyes from injury during the eclipse. Never look directly at the sun during a solar eclipse except during the very brief time the sun is in total eclipse; and even then, with caution. Looking directly at the sun can cause permanent damage to your eyes. A solar eclipse occurs when the moon moves between the sun and the earth. The moon causes the light of the sun to be blocked from reaching earth, casting a shadow on earth. A total solar eclipse is when the moon completely blocks the sun. A partial solar eclipse is when the moon only blocks part of the sun.

Additionally, because you will be looking through your cell phone's screen, you won't be seeing the true brightness of the sun—it will only appear as bright as your.

It takes some skill and some extra equipment to take dramatic pictures of a solar eclipse. But it is possible to capture the mood even with a simple cell phone camera. Never look directly at the Sun without proper eye protection. You can seriously hurt your eyes, and even go blind. Whether you have a smartphone or a more complex camera, planning is the key to a successful shot.

Follow these simple tips to click photos from your smartphone of Solar eclipse today

Unless you've been living under a rock, you undoubtedly know about the total solar eclipse moving across the US on Monday, August Of course, where you live or plan on traveling to will impact just how much of the eclipse you can see, but nonetheless, even if you can only see a small portion of it, you surely want to take photos. And since our phones are often our camera as well, here are some tips to take the best eclipse photos you can use with an iPhone or Android device. It should go without saying, but I'd be remiss if I didn't mention it: If you're going to look directly at the sun during the eclipse, you need to wear protective glasses.

Solar Eclipse and Your Eyes

You can seriously damage your eyes by watching a solar eclipse without proper protection NOT sunglasses! Learn about different types of eclipses. You can NOT safely look at any of it.

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